House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

• September 9, 2009

Nordelta House Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos plusMOOD 03 595x446 House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

House in Nordelta, image courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

Nordelta House Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos plusMOOD 04 595x446 House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

House in Nordelta, image courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

Argentina-based Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos has designed a house in Nordelta, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

+ Project description courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

Far from the predesigned and homogeneous models, the architects decided to put the accent in the surroundings, joining the functionality of the house with its context, incorporating natural materials such as stone and wood, and thus, obtaining a better integration between interior and exterior spaces. A conic-shaped site, north-oriented, which opens to a wonderful view to the lake, was the starting point to think this house, a young couple’s home.

Nordelta House Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos plusMOOD 05 House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

House in Nordelta, image courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

Following the site’s lines, the geometry of the house is proposed as two blocks opening as a fan toward the best views and orientation, creating a “void” between them that becomes the central space of the house.

Nordelta House Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos plusMOOD 08 595x446 House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

House in Nordelta, image courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

The project looked for a strong relation with the exterior landscape without repeating the urban model of a house with small openings. This is why the ground floor’s sector that faces the lake opens almost completely to the exterior, with large floor to ceiling windows. These large glazed panels that let the light in also allow to get in direct contact with the garden’s grass, the water in the pool and the lake.

However, toward the street, a more reserved façade was designed, with windows at the observant’s height, creating a balance between privacy and landscape. This relation breaks in the main access, where a continuous view is generated toward the end of the site through a large window, accentuating the void effect that is produced between the two blocks of the house.

This space, a continuous path, starts in the exterior with a floor covered in small white stones and continues in the interior with a white concrete floor. This path ends in a patio that holds a growing tree, which lets its pink flowers fall on the white stones in spring time.

It is this patio the visual connector and provider of certain privacy between the totally glazed main floor’s rooms. The tree works as a solar filter in summer, when its foliage gets thicker.

Another thing the firm searched for in the ground floor was the entire flexibility of the space leaving the office room and living room included or isolated according to the need of use, being able to expand the social space or to make different activities coexist at the same time. The stairs and a sliding door control the relation between the spaces.

On the upper floor, the two blocks, one for the adults and the other for the couple’s future children, are connected and separated at the same time by the central space which is also a private living room, like a bridge crossing the void over the access. The children’s block is made of two bedrooms, a bathroom and a patio that works as an expansion and illuminates the common space, reinforcing the relationship with nature.

The master bedroom has its own terraced expansion. It also has a relaxation space with a roman bathtub that overlooks the lake, a big dressing room and bathroom, leaving all its functions in complete privacy in regards to the rest of the house.

Structure

A mixed structure made of bearing walls and metal columns was used to allow a major aperture toward the garden. The slabs were made of prestressed beams and expandible polystyrene blocks, lightening the building and, thus, compensating for the stone’s high weight.

The bearing walls were covered with stone in the most unfavorable orientations, providing more thermal insulation and waterproofing.

Lighting

The exteriors were solved by creating concrete appliances in situ on the side façades and two long-life built-in appliances at the double height of the entrance hall. Built-in appliances in the ceiling predominate in the interior bringing out wall planes and achieving lighting by contrast.

Nordelta House Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos plusMOOD GRD FLR PLAN 595x827 House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

House in Nordelta - Ground floor plan, courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

Nordelta House Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos plusMOOD 1ST FLR 595x827 House in Nordelta | Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

House in Nordelta - 1st floor plan, courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

+ Project data / credits

Project: House in Nordelta – Buenos Aires – Argentina
Authors: Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos (Adriana Sternberg & Mariano Kohen, Architects)
Built-up area: 265 m2
Site area: 1050 m2
Year of completion: 2005
Construction: Afiar Construcciones SRL
Calculations: Ing. César Tocker

+ All images and drawings courtesy of Sternberg Kohen Arquitectos

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Category: Architecture, House

Comments (1)

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  1. Ani says:

    Lovely! Thanks for the post David!